COTTONTAIL RABBITS (Sylvilagus floridanus)Fig.1. Eastern cottontail rabbit, Sylvilagus floridanus

Scott R. Craven
Extension Wildlife Specialist
Department of Wildlife Ecology
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Madison, Wisconsin 53706

Fig. 1. Eastern cottontail rabbit, Sylvilagus floridanus
 

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Low fences are very effective around gardens or shrubs.

Hardware cloth cylinders will protect fruit trees and ornamental plants.

Habitat Modification

Removal of brush piles, debris, dumps, and other cover makes an area less suitable for rabbits.

Frightening

Several methods are available but none are reliable.

Repellents

A wide variety of commercial formulations is available; most are taste repellents based on the fungicide thiram. Home-remedy types may provide some relief.

Toxicants

None are registered.

Fumigants

None are registered.

Trapping

Commercial live traps or homemade box traps are effective, particularly during winter in northern states.

Shooting

Sport hunting and/or routine shooting of problem individuals are very effective methods.

Other Methods

Many "gimmick" solutions are available but unreliable. For example, sections of garden hose to simulate snakes, water-filled jugs to create frightening, distorted reflections.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage 1994 logo

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

 

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