BATS (ORDER: CHIOPTERA)Fig. 1. Little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus)

Arthur M. Greenhall
Research Associate
Department of Mammalogy
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY 10024

Stephen C. Frantz
Vertebrate Vector Specialist
Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research
New York State Department of Health
Albany, NY 12201-0509

Fig. 1. Little brown bat, Myotis lucifugus
 

Damage Prevention and Control Methods

Exclusion

Polypropylene netting checkvalves simplify getting bats out.

Quality bat-proofing permanently excludes bats.

Repellents

Naphthalene: limited efficacy.

Illumination.

Air drafts/ventilation.

Ultrasonic devices: not effective.

Sticky deterrents: limited efficacy.

Toxicants

None are registered.

Fumigants

None are registered.

Trapping

Available, but unnecessarily complicated to exclusion and bat-proofing.

Shooting

Not efficient and likely illegal in most circumstances.

Other Methods

Sanitation and cleanup.

Artificial roosts.

Removal of Ocassional Bat Intruders

When no bite or contact has occurred, help the bat escape (otherwise submit for rabies testing).

Conservation and Public Education

Information itself functions as a management technique.

Editors

Scott E. Hygnstrom; Robert M. Timm; Gary E. Larson

Prevention and Control of Wildlife Damage 1994 logo

PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF WILDLIFE DAMAGE — 1994

Cooperative Extension Division Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Nebraska -Lincoln

United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Animal Damage Control

Great Plains Agricultural Council Wildlife Committee

 

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